1.1.3 Learning outcomes for Module A

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Unit 1 Contents

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What you will study is organised to enable you to meet certain ‘learning outcomes’.  This term is quite a useful one, even though it is part of the jargon of current educational bureaucracy.  As you probably know, it is standard practice in British universities that a module has a set of learning outcomes.

Most simply, learning outcomes state what you should be able to do when you have completed your study of this module.

You should by then have acquired new knowledge and understanding, and be able – when the need or opportunity arises – to explain it, discuss it, share it with others, and act in light of it.

Draft learning outcomes (LOs) for Module A

Note This statement of LOs is draft because its exact form in each university/college in which the module is studied will be determined by that university/college.

Subject-specific learning outcomes

By the end of the module students will be able to:

  1. explain some of the main concepts and principles in Catholic Social Teaching, in particular: human dignity, the common good, the priority of labour over capital, solidarity, the universal destination of material goods, natural law
  2. outline the sources of Catholic Social Teaching, including the prophetic tradition in the Christian Bible
  3. summarise what CST means in practice for working life (studied in Unit 4) and for [two out of]* the following four areas of human living: ecological responsibility (Unit 3), economic life (Unit 5), family life in society (Unit 6), duties and rights in practice (Unit 7)
  4. describe some main landmarks in the historical development of CST since 1891
  5. discuss lines of argument in defence and critique of the content of CST in the above areas.

*   If you are studying the module for 15 credits, you are expected to study CST on working life (Unit 4) and two out of the four topics addressed in units 3, 5, 6 and 7.

Generic learning outcomes

By the end of the module students will be able to:

  1. identify, access and deploy basic methods of analysis to primary and secondary sources
  2. make use of on-line resources in academic study
  3. employ reflective practice as a mode of learning
  4. articulate lines of argument about contested theoretical and practical issues.

Academic Level of module (subject to confirmation by each university/college): 5 or 6 (= second or third year of f/t degree)

Synopsis of the curriculum

Here is an outline, unit by unit, of what the module will cover to enable you to meet those outcomes:

The module is structured into eight units.  The first two are introductory.  The next five combine study of one main principle and one area of practice.  The eighth gives a concluding synthesis.

The topics of the eight units are:

  1. Introduction: sources of CST, including the prophetic tradition in Christian Scripture
  2. Historical background of modern CST; outline of its main principles; how to connect study of CST with social action
  3. Humans as made in ‘the image of God’ and ecological responsibility*
  4. Working life and the ‘the priority of labour over capital’
  5. Business, economics and the ‘universal destination of goods’*
  6. Family life in society and ‘natural law’*
  7. Human dignity in practice: duties and rights*
  8. Synthesis: CST in historical perspective

* As noted above, if the module is studied for 15 credits, students are expected to study two out of the four asterisked units.

The above LOs and synopsis of the curriculum do not cover all of CST.  This is because this module is one of two.  The twin module, ‘Living in a Just and Free Society’, addresses topics in CST not referred to here.

Learning outcomes for units

As well the learning outcomes for the module overall, you will find at the beginning of units 2-8 a short list of LOs for each of these. There will be a reminder of them at the end of each unit, so that you can check whether you have a sense that your study of the unit has enables you to attain them.  If you think you are shaky on one or more of them, you can look again at the relevant part of the unit.

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