2.4.7 Conclusion of historical outline

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Unit 2 Contents

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That is an appropriate point at which to end this brief historical outline.

 

We can, following Thompson (pp. 26-32), sum up the history of Catholic engagement with social questions during the modern period as having moved through three stages:

  • the very strong anti-modern reaction of, especially, the century after the French Revolution, epitomized by the Syllabus of Errors (1864)

  • the ground-breaking, critical yet constructive, engagement of Rerum Novarum (1891) and Quadragesmo Anno (1931; we shall look at this in Unit 3)

  • the ‘human rights revolution’ of the 1960s, focused on Second Vatican Council, and, since then, the tension between some who want only to consolidate the Vatican II developments and others who think they need to be taken very much further. 

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Reflection

If you are a Catholic, you will possibly have a sense, from your own convictions and activities, of where you stand in the context of debates in the Church since Vatican II.  If so, how would you describe your stance?

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I hope that the historical outline will prove helpful as you study the rest of the module.  This will give the opportunity to look more fully and deeply at many of the things it has mentioned.

The next screen gives suggestions of ways you can review your learning for this unit and discuss it with others.

 

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End of 2.4 THE HISTORICAL CONTEXT OF MODERN CST

Go to 2.5 CONCLUSION OF UNIT 2

Module B outline

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